IMO, Shopping != LOB

Apr 9, 2013 at 7:22 PM
I feel that one failure in this application guidance is the subject material.

LOB applications are typically boring, but very data-oriented. Take, for example, Mutual fund companies... TONS of data that is very hierarchical, but this typical layout (this app looks just like the Windows Store) is not suited well for things like Financial applications, or Inventory Management or any of the less flashy "demo-ware" apps.

To me, a shopping site is simple and NOT a true LOB application.

Just my $0.02 worth
Coordinator
Apr 19, 2013 at 9:36 PM
Tommck,

I agree that we did not address your scenario for hierarchical data. That said, the product catalog is hierarchical as we had to decide how to display a hub page, product categories such as bikes, product sub-categories such as mountain and touring bikes, and product details such as a specific bike. Are there ideas that you can gleam from this product hierarchy?

We stopped using the term LOB and started using business apps. The goal of the reference implementation was to demonstrates some of the common challenges of creating business apps and yes there are still many more challenges that need to be addressed.

We want to demonstrate how to implement Windows Features such as Suspend, Terminate, and Resume, Snap, Live Tile, Search, Navigation, and Settings using C#. We also want to demonstrate common business app challenges such as local data management, interacting with services, validation, and authentication and authorization. Lastly we wanted to demonstrate how to implement MVVM, delegate commands, and loose coupled pub/sub pattern.

What else would be helpful? Can you give more specifics of the scenarios for mutual fund companies and inventory management that you need guidance on?

Thanks for the post as this is useful feedback.

blaine
Apr 19, 2013 at 9:46 PM
It's really all about the UI. I haven't seen a UI that I would say is analogous to something actually useful for an internal corporate app. Generally, all I see are these columns of boxes. What about tabular data?

Heck, how is Microsoft going to make modern versions of Excel?

There is very little information on the screen at one time in every demo I see, so I'm looking to see recommendations on how to write apps that are not pretty apps to try to get people to buy them versus apps that adhere to some guidelines but are useful to corporate users.

I hope this makes sense. Also typing on a tablet, so it's a bit tough to edit this.


blainew <[email removed]> wrote:

From: blainew

Tommck,

I agree that we did not address your scenario for hierarchical data. That said, the product catalog is hierarchical as we had to decide how to display a hub page, product categories such as bikes, product sub-categories such as mountain and touring bikes, and product details such as a specific bike. Are there ideas that you can gleam from this product hierarchy?

We stopped using the term LOB and started using business apps. The goal of the reference implementation was to demonstrates some of the common challenges of creating business apps and yes there are still many more challenges that need to be addressed.

We want to demonstrate how to implement Windows Features such as Suspend, Terminate, and Resume, Snap, Live Tile, Search, Navigation, and Settings using C#. We also want to demonstrate common business app challenges such as local data management, interacting with services, validation, and authentication and authorization. Lastly we wanted to demonstrate how to implement MVVM, delegate commands, and loose coupled pub/sub pattern.

What else would be helpful? Can you give more specifics of the scenarios for mutual fund companies and inventory management that you need guidance on?

Thanks for the post as this is useful feedback.

blaine
Coordinator
Apr 23, 2013 at 3:53 PM
Tommck,

Thanks for the feedback.

blaine
May 1, 2013 at 3:12 AM
I am finding the WinRT story becoming progressively more frustrating and confused. The company I work for lives and breaths LOB. Silverlight and WPF were/are/and still remain despite efforts to pretend otherwise the best choices for delivering LOB. It might have made sense to focus on WinRT even at the expense of making Silverlight and WPF orphans. However, the road to moving a large code base to WinRT has become a non starter.

Killing Prism and the Silverlight/WPF toolkit control libraries is a potentially fatal mistake if this is the cost of the WinRT reboot.

Frankly, it would have been much less damaging had a significant part of Prism and the Silverlight/WPF toolkits been made available on WinRT.

Worse, Xamarin/Mono on Android and IOS appears to be a path with less friction for .Net shops whose bosses have to make hard and fast business decisions.

WinRT has to have a datagrid control that is an integral part of the runtime. Likewise for date and time pickers, autocomplete boxes, inotifiydataerrorinfo on controls, charting and all the other toolkit controls that are essential for LOB. The fixation on panels and containers will lead to lovely boxes of LOB sterility.

The core of WinRT presents tremendous potential. DirectX and native code integration with seamless XAML compositing is a formidable capability. We need the other framework bits in a hurry. Give us a control toolkit and a variant of Prism that strongly mirrors its Silverlight/WPF ilk. If we don't get a datagrid soon, or validation support on controls, or non-rectangular clipping regions, or all the other toolkit and prism goodness, then we will have to sit back and wait for some startup to come up with the goods while we move our apps to Mono.

By the time that happens WinRT might become another Palm or WebOS.

Please save the windows runtime.
Coordinator
May 7, 2013 at 5:43 PM
noemata,

We are in the process of planning for the next release of Prism for Windows Runtime. What would be helpful for future versions of Prism?

blaine
May 9, 2013 at 11:50 PM
It would be nice to have a VS template for this project. Meaning, click New Project > Prism for Windows Store App... and a basic project with XAML, references, etc. added to quickly get started.

Also like to see this project added with Windows Phone support.

Thanks
May 26, 2013 at 9:08 PM